Updated on 21/02/2021

Best VPNs For Linux 2021

One of the most confusing things for new Linux users is how many variations and distributions of the operating system there are. From Ubuntu and Fedora to Kali and Mint, all of these distributions work differently, which can make finding compatible software difficult – especially if you’re on the search for a quality VPN.

Updated on 21/02/2021
Written By: Ravi Thakur

Not every VPN works with Linux, but thankfully, there’s a growing list of providers that are slowly adding expanding support by offering users their own native Linux apps. Plug-and-play native VPN clients require far less configuration than open-source clients and often come with far more security features and benefits. To help you find the most suitable Linux VPN for your specific requirements, our researchers have spent weeks testing the best providers out there. 

Short on time? Here are the Top 5 Linux VPN Picks Quick Overview

  • Excellent speeds - no slow down experience
  • Zero latency – smooth gaming experience
  • Ease of use - set up in a couple of minutes
  • No-logs policy - Your data is 100% untraceable.
  • Impressive security – military grade encryption
ExpressVPN
$8.32/mo 30 Days Moneyback
Available on:
Speed Test:
107ms Avg.
45.09Mbps Avg.
9.29Mbps Avg.
Connection Ping Download Speed Upload Speed
Starting speed US 8 ms 58.56 Mbps 12.25 Mbps
Quick connect US server 10 ms 54.52 Mbps 11.85 Mbps
Manual connect US server 12 ms 53.22 Mbps 11.12 Mbps
Quick connect UK server 140 ms 42.85 Mbps 6.69 Mbps
Manual connect UK server 133 ms 37.64 Mbps 9.21 Mbps
Quick connect FR server 82 ms 40.41 Mbps 11.09 Mbps
Quick connect JP server 180 ms 38.42 Mbps 6.01 Mbps
Quick connect AU server 291 ms 35.11 Mbps 6.09 Mbps
VPN locations:
145 Servers in
VPN locations: 92 Countries
  • Albania
  • Algeria
  • Andorra
  • Argentina
  • Armenia
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Azerbaijan
  • Bahamas
  • Bangladesh
  • Belarus
  • Belgium
  • Bhutan
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Brazil
  • Brunei
  • Bulgaria
  • Cambodia
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Croatia
  • Cyprus
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Ecuador
  • Egypt
  • Estonia
  • Finland
  • France
  • Georgia
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Guatemala
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Ireland
  • Isle of Man
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Jersey
  • Kenya
  • South Korea
  • Kyrgyzstan
  • Laos
  • Latvia
  • Liechtenstein
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Macao
  • North Macedonia
  • Malaysia
  • Malta
  • Mexico
  • Moldova
  • Monaco
  • Mongolia
  • Montenegro
  • Myanmar [Burma]
  • Netherlands
  • New Zealand
  • Norway
  • Pakistan
  • Peru
  • Philippines
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Serbia
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • South Africa
  • Spain
  • Sri Lanka
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • Turkey
  • Ukraine
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • Uruguay
  • Venezuela
  • Vietnam

The fastest VPN in the world is our #1 best-rated VPN for its outstanding security, consistent speed and reliability

Visit ExpressVPN
  • Fast, stable, and encrypted connections
  • Multi-device security for Windows, Mac, Android, and iOS
  • Proxy extensions for web browsers Chrome and Firefox
  • Up to 6 simultaneously connected devices
NordVPN
$3.71/mo 30 Days Moneyback
Available on:
Speed Test:
163ms Avg.
42.71Mbps Avg.
9.23Mbps Avg.
Connection Ping Download Speed Upload Speed
Starting speed US 11 ms 56.23 Mbps 11.71 Mbps
Quick connect US server 10 ms 49.83 Mbps 10.75 Mbps
Manual connect US server 15 ms 46.73 Mbps 10.64 Mbps
Quick connect UK server 148 ms 45.79 Mbps 11.11 Mbps
Manual connect UK server 241 ms 32.01 Mbps 10.85 Mbps
Quick connect FR server 84 ms 49.99 Mbps 11.28 Mbps
Quick connect JP server 361 ms 23.14 Mbps 1.69 Mbps
Quick connect AU server 434 ms 37.97 Mbps 5.84 Mbps
VPN locations:
75 Servers in
VPN locations: 59 Countries
  • United States
  • Canada
  • Brazil
  • Argentina
  • Mexico
  • Costa Rica
  • Chile
  • South Africa
  • India
  • United Arab Emirates
  • Israel
  • Turkey
  • Australia
  • Singapore
  • Japan
  • Hong Kong
  • New Zealand
  • Taiwan
  • Vietnam
  • Indonesia
  • Malaysia
  • South Korea
  • Thailand
  • United Kingdom
  • Germany
  • Netherlands
  • France
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • Belgium
  • Denmark
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Ireland
  • Czech Republic
  • Italy
  • Spain
  • Finland
  • Serbia
  • Austria
  • Slovakia
  • Slovenia
  • Bulgaria
  • Hungary
  • Latvia
  • Romania
  • Portugal
  • Luxembourg
  • Ukraine
  • Greece
  • Estonia
  • Iceland
  • Albania
  • Cyprus
  • Croatia
  • Moldova
  • Bosnia and Herzegovina
  • Georgia
  • North Macedonia

While NordVPN didn’t quite manage to make our number one spot, it’s an excellent VPN with a long list of security features and server locations that provide phenomenal value.

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AirVPN
$3.35/mo 3 Days Moneyback
Available on:
Speed Test:
0ms Avg.
0Mbps Avg.
0Mbps Avg.
VPN locations:
242 Servers in
VPN locations: 21 Countries
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Brazil
  • Canada
  • Switzerland
  • Czech Republic
  • Germany
  • Estonia
  • Spain
  • United Kingdom
  • Japan
  • Latvia
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Romania
  • Serbia
  • Sweden
  • Singapore
  • Ukraine
  • United States

Visit AirVPN
ProtonVPN
$6.63/mo Days Moneyback
Available on:
Speed Test:
0ms Avg.
0Mbps Avg.
0Mbps Avg.
VPN locations:
1092 Servers in
VPN locations: 54 Countries
  • Argentina
  • Austria
  • Australia
  • Belgium
  • Bulgaria
  • Brazil
  • Canada
  • Switzerland
  • Chile
  • Colombia
  • Costa Rica
  • Czech Republic
  • Germany
  • Denmark
  • Estonia
  • Spain
  • Finland
  • France
  • Greece
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • India
  • Iceland
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • South Korea
  • Lithuania
  • Luxembourg
  • Latvia
  • Moldova
  • Mexico
  • Malaysia
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • New Zealand
  • Peru
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Serbia
  • Russia
  • Sweden
  • Singapore
  • Slovenia
  • Slovakia
  • Turkey
  • Taiwan
  • Ukraine
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States
  • South Africa

Visit ProtonVPN
TorGuard
$3.89/mo 30 Days Moneyback
Available on:
Speed Test:
0ms Avg.
0Mbps Avg.
0Mbps Avg.
VPN locations:
56 Servers in
VPN locations: 45 Countries
  • Australia
  • Austria
  • Belgium
  • Brazil
  • Bulgaria
  • Canada
  • Chile
  • Czech Republic
  • Denmark
  • Finland
  • France
  • Germany
  • Greece
  • Hong Kong
  • Hungary
  • Iceland
  • India
  • Indonesia
  • Ireland
  • Israel
  • Italy
  • Japan
  • Luxembourg
  • Mexico
  • Moldova
  • Netherlands
  • Norway
  • Poland
  • Portugal
  • Romania
  • Russia
  • Singapore
  • Slovakia
  • South Africa
  • South Korea
  • Spain
  • Sweden
  • Switzerland
  • New Zealand
  • Taiwan
  • Thailand
  • Ukraine
  • United Arab Emirates
  • United Kingdom
  • United States

Visit TorGuard

What is a VPN and Why Do You Need One for Linux? 

A Virtual Private Network (VPN) is a tool that masks your IP address to make your online activity completely anonymous. It does this by routing your internet connection through an encrypted tunnel and connecting you to a private server. As your connection isn’t routed through your Internet Service Provider (ISP), your ISP can’t see what you’re doing online and isn’t able to throttle your bandwidth during peak times, which means VPNs are a popular choice among internet users who regularly download large files, directly or via torrents. If your laptop is running Linux, a VPN makes it much safer to use unsecured WiFi networks, as all of the information you’re transferring while you’re connected is encrypted. 

Speed and Security are Key Factors When Choosing a VPN 

Speed is important no matter what you’re using the internet for, so you don’t want your VPN to slow down your connection when you’re using it. Your provider’s software should run so smoothly that you don’t even realize you’re connected to it. Most providers operate servers that have been optimized for specific reasons, whether that’s unblocking streaming apps such as Netflix or Amazon Prime Video, or providing the fastest speeds possible for seeding and leeching files in torrenting apps. If you’re playing video games through your Linux devices, fast speeds are important so your games don’t suffer from lag or disconnections. 

Security is just as important, especially if you’re connecting to unsecured WiFi networks or remote working. With online cyber attacks on the rise, you can’t rely on antivirus software to keep you safe in 2020. Thankfully, your VPN can. Just look out for security features such as double VPN protection, malware blocking tools, and military-grade encryption.

How to set up a VPN on Linux 

All of the providers that we’ve featured in this list contain native apps for Linux users, so all you’ll have to do is take out a subscription with the VPN you want to use and download the app onto the device that’s running Linux. 

However, these native apps may not work with some Linux distributions, which means you’ll have to install your provider’s open configuration files with OpenVPN. The following installation instructions work for Ubuntu distribution but may vary slightly for others. 

  1. Open your terminal.
  2. Type sudo apt-get install -y openvpn and press the Enter key.
  3. Insert your admin password and hit Enter again. 
  4. Type y and hit Enter to complete the installation. 
  5. Type sudo apt-get install network-manager network-manager-openvpn network-manager-openvpn-gnome and hit Enter.
  6. Type sudo apt-get install openvpn easy-rsa.

Once you’ve installed OpenVPN, you’ll then need to do the following: 

  1. Open your terminal again and type sude openvpn –config and hit enter. 
  2. Drag and drop the .ovpn config file for the server you want to connect to into the terminal and the correct path will be automatically captured. Hit Enter.
  3. Wait for the ‘Initialization Sequence Completed’ message to appear and you’ll then be connected to the VPN. 

Does Linux Come with VPNs Built-In? 

Linux doesn’t have VPNs pre-installed, but it’s possible to create your own VPN using OpenSource and a private cloud service. However, this won’t provide the same security features as using a paid-for VPN, and due to the amount of time and money that’s involved in setting up a VPN this way, it’s definitely not worth the hassle. 

What to Consider When Choosing a VPN for Linux 

As not all VPNs are compatible with Linux operating systems, providers that offer native apps for Linux should be your primary area of focus, but it’s also important for those apps to deliver secure connections and ultra-fast speeds when you’re using them. Here’s what you should look out for when you’re choosing a VPN for Linux. 

Native Linux Apps 

Larger providers will offer native apps that work with most Linux distributions, and these should always be prioritized as native apps are much easier to use than OpenVPN software. Linux isn’t just for desktops, though, so if you run Linux as an OS on your Mac or Chromebook, make sure it’s supported by the provider that you’re using to avoid issues with compatibility. 

Privacy 

VPNs are designed to protect your privacy when you’re online, so if you’re worried about how much attention your ISP or government agencies are paying to your browsing history, you should prioritize VPN providers that operate with strict no-logging policies and the highest levels of encryption.

Unblocking Content 

If you’re a fan of streaming apps such as Netflix, Disney+, and Hulu, you can use your VPN to unlock content libraries in other countries. While many providers have servers covering multiple countries, your VPN needs to be powerful enough to bypass the VPN detection tools that apps and websites use. Choosing a reputable VPN with a large network of servers will increase your chances of successfully unblocking content. 

Security 

VPNs are the most effective tool to improve your online security, and many providers offer powerful security features that have been designed from the ground up to protect your Linux devices from hacking attempts. In addition to military-grade encryption, look out for other security features such as double VPN protection, a kill switch, malware and ad blocking tools, and DNS/IPv6 leak protection. 

Top Ten VPN Services for Linux - Full Overview

Written By: Ravi Thakur

1. ExpressVPN

Throughout our rigorous testing, we found ExpressVPN to be the best VPN out there for Linux users. It uses a command-line interface for Linux and offers quality speeds across all of its 3000+ servers. ExpressVPN is also one of the best VPNs to protect your privacy, thanks to its patented TrustedServer RAM-based technology, which reboots after every session, making it impossible for this provider to keep any logs of your internet activity. 

In addition to supporting the most popular Linux distributions, ExpressVPN also offers set up instructions for Kali, Ubuntu Studio, Linux Mint, and other OSes. And if you’re planning on using it to unblock websites, ExpressVPN has some of the most powerful geo-filtering tools available, meaning you’ll be able to easily access content that isn’t usually available in your country while benefiting from some of the fastest speeds around. Don’t believe us? Just take ExpressVPN’s speed test, which automatically filters server locations according to their speed index, latency, and download speeds.

Works with

Key Features

Available On Ubuntu, CentOS, Debian, Fedora, Raspbian (32-bit only) and Arch.
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 3000
Top download speed reached 94Mbps
VPN locations 160 locations in 94 countries
Maximum devices supported Five simultaneous connections
Plans one month, six months and 12 months
24/7 live chat Yes

The easiest VPN to use on devices operating Linux

Speed

Connection Ping Download Speed Upload Speed
Starting speed US 8 ms 58.56 Mbps 12.25 Mbps
Quick connect US server 10 ms 54.52 Mbps 11.85 Mbps
Manual connect US server 12 ms 53.22 Mbps 11.12 Mbps
Quick connect UK server 140 ms 42.85 Mbps 6.69 Mbps
Manual connect UK server 133 ms 37.64 Mbps 9.21 Mbps
Quick connect FR server 82 ms 40.41 Mbps 11.09 Mbps
Quick connect JP server 180 ms 38.42 Mbps 6.01 Mbps
Quick connect AU server 291 ms 35.11 Mbps 6.09 Mbps

Not Recommended for... It’s the best provider for Linux operating systems, but it’s also the most expensive.

Bottom Line 

If you’re looking for the fastest, most reliable, and most secure VPN for devices running Linux, you’ll struggle to beat what’s on offer from ExpressVPN. Packed full of amazing security features, its Linux apps have been designed to guarantee the fastest speeds in comparison to other providers. 

Read ExpressVPN Full Review

2. NordVPN

NordVPN has built a solid reputation among VPN users thanks to its lightning-fast speeds and privacy features, with a growing roster of apps for a wide variety of Linux distributions, meaning it couldn’t be any easier for Linux users to set up. You can find all of the instructions you need here on the NordVPN website, and if the distribution you’re using isn’t featured, just follow the additional guide for connecting it via your terminal. 

With a strict no-logging policy, NordVPN doesn’t track, collect or share your private data, and additional security features such as double VPN protection and Onion Over VPN will ensure your connection stays private and protected. Our researchers tested connection speeds for over 100 servers in a variety of different locations and didn’t have any issues unblocking Netflix or Amazon Prime Video, making NordVPN a solid choice if you’re a fan of spending lazy weekends on the couch.

Works with

Key Features

Available On Debian, Ubuntu, Elementary OS, Linux Mint.
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 5000
Top download speed reached 91 Mbps
VPN locations Over 80 in 60+ countries
Maximum devices supported Up to six
Plans one month, one year, two year, and three-year plans.
24/7 live chat Yes

Powerful security features and ultra-fast speeds for Linux users

Speed

Connection Ping Download Speed Upload Speed
Starting speed US 11 ms 56.23 Mbps 11.71 Mbps
Quick connect US server 10 ms 49.83 Mbps 10.75 Mbps
Manual connect US server 15 ms 46.73 Mbps 10.64 Mbps
Quick connect UK server 148 ms 45.79 Mbps 11.11 Mbps
Manual connect UK server 241 ms 32.01 Mbps 10.85 Mbps
Quick connect FR server 84 ms 49.99 Mbps 11.28 Mbps
Quick connect JP server 361 ms 23.14 Mbps 1.69 Mbps
Quick connect AU server 434 ms 37.97 Mbps 5.84 Mbps

Not Recommended for... You might encounter some UI issues depending on which Linux distribution you’re using.

Bottom Line 

Boasting a network of over 3000 high-quality servers, many of which that have been optimized specifically for gaming, streaming, and torrenting, NordVPN is a quality choice for Linux users that have high download requirements and don’t want their bandwidth choked by their ISP.

Read NordVPN Full Review

3. AirVPN

As it runs an Open VPN-based service, AirVPN has become one of the go-providers for Linux users, especially with so many customization options available in everything from its subscription plans to its native Linux apps. All of these apps are supported via the command line or a useful GUI – a rarity amongst many VPNs. 

In terms of price, the amount of subscription plans on offer means there should be a price point for everyone, and you get decent value for money thanks to the features that are on offer. All plans include military-grade encryption, a killswitch, and a strict no-logging policy for enhanced privacy. There aren’t many servers to choose from, but they still offered impressive speeds that were fast enough to support HD streaming. 

Works with

Key Features

Available On Debian, OpenSUSE, Raspbian, Fedora/CentOS, Arch, Portable, AppImage, Portable Mono
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 250
Top download speed reached 80 Mbps
VPN locations 72
Maximum devices supported Five
Plans three days, one-month, three month, six month, one year, two year and three year plans available.
24/7 live chat Yes

Advanced configurations for more experienced VPN users

Speed

Not Recommended for... A small network of servers means that AirVPN isn’t able to unblock streaming apps in locations such as the UK and France, so you won’t be able to access BBC iPlayer or ITV Player.

Bottom Line 

If you’re looking for a cheap VPN that offers excellent support for Linux users, AirVPN is a great choice, with quality privacy and security features that can be customized for more experienced VPN users. 

 

Read AirVPN Full Review

4. ProtonVPN

As it’s based in Switzerland, ProtonVPN doesn’t fall under the five-eyes, nine-eyes, or 14-eyes jurisdictions and users benefit from some of the strongest privacy laws in the world as a result. Also, there’s a strict no-logging policy, AES-256 bit encryption, and DNS leak protection, with all internet traffic routed through secure core servers to mitigate sophisticated attacks from hackers. 

Every Linux distribution is supported and setup is easy if you follow the instructions provided on the website. Plus, a special Linux VPN command-line is available for the easiest installation. With over 1000 servers to connect to, ProtonVPN is also a useful tool for unblocking popular streaming apps and websites, and high-speed connections of up to 10Gbps ensure you’ll never have to put up with lag or bandwidth throttling ever again.

Works with

Key Features

Available On Archlinux, Manjaro, SUSE, Fedora, CentOS, RHEL, Debian, Ubuntu, Linux Mint
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 1000
Top download speed reached 79 Mbps
VPN locations 54
Maximum devices supported Up to ten
Plans Basic Plan ($5 per month), Best Plan ($10 per month) and Visionary Plan ($30 per month)
24/7 live chat Yes

Seamless switching between 1000+ servers to unblock websites and apps

Speed

Not Recommended for... There’s a free plan on offer, but avoid it at all costs if you want to enjoy all of the features that we’ve mentioned above, as it only covers the bare basics.

Bottom Line 

ProtonVPN is a smaller VPN with a focus on privacy and security, making it an excellent choice for Linux users that want to keep their online activity hidden. With apps for every Linux distribution out there, it’s easy to set up and runs so smoothly that you won’t experience any slowdowns in your connection when you’re using it. 

 

Read ProtonVPN Full Review

5. TorGuard VPN

With 64-bit and 32-bit clients available for the Debian/Ubuntu client, all you need to do is follow the instructions on the TorGuard website here. It only takes a couple of minutes to install, and once your Linux device is connected, you’ll be able to enjoy decent speeds with servers in more than 68 locations. If we’re being honest, the speeds were a little slower than we’re used to experiencing through more reputable providers such as NordVPN and ExpressVPN, but they were still fast enough to keep us going without any lag or disconnections. 

Due to the high configuration that’s involved with other Linux distributions, TorGuard is best suited for tech-heads and more advanced VPN users rather than beginners, but you don’t have to be an expert to recognize TorGuard’s excellent security features. All subscriptions benefit from multiple protocol support, Perfect Forward Secrecy, adware and malware blocking, and a strict no-logging policy.

Works with

Key Features

Available On Debian/Ubuntu, Red Hat and Arch
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 3000
Top download speed reached 76 Mbps
VPN locations 68 in 50 countries
Maximum devices supported Eight
Plans One month ($9.99 per month), three month ($19.99), six month ($29.99) and one-year ($59.99) plans available
24/7 live chat Yes

Highly configurable with a great selection of servers

Speed

Not Recommended for... Performance is easily beatable by more established VPNs and you’ll have to dive deep into TorGuard’s configuration options to get the most out of the features that are on offer.

Bottom Line 

If you’re willing to commit to the annual package, TorGuard VPN is a fairly cheap provider with decent support for Linux users. Its server technology is powerful enough to unblock most websites, but even with unlimited bandwidth and data, it might be worth choosing another provider if you’re going hard on the torrents, as its download speeds are easily beatable. 

Read TorGuard Full Review

6. Mullvad VPN

If you’re already familiar with most VPN providers, Mullvad may be a name that you’ve not heard of, but don’t let that fool you. It’s a fantastic alternative to Surfshark for Linux users, especially if you’re not willing to commit to annual subscriptions, as you can pick up a monthly plan for just $6.88 per month. Mullvad’s open-source Debian/Ubuntu client comes with a full GUI, making it easy to set up and use if you follow the instructions on the website. 

As it’s based in Sweden, there’s a heavy focus on security and privacy, and all plans include AES 256-bit encryption, a kill switch, DNS/IPv6 leak protection, and the WireGuard protocol as a result. In addition, if you’re super serious about not giving out any information that could be traced back to you, you can pay for your subscription using bitcoin or gift cards. There’s a free trial that lasts for just three hours, but that’s long enough to get an understanding of how smoothly the client software runs on your device.

Works with

Key Features

Available On: Debian/Ubuntu and Fedora,
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 550
Top download speed reached 76 Mbps
VPN locations 59
Maximum devices supported Eight
Plans One month ($6.88 per month)
24/7 live chat Yes

Speed

Not Recommended for... Mullvad’s focus is on security and privacy, but not on unblocking websites. Our researchers weren’t able to unblock Amazon Prime Video, BBC iPlayer, or Disney+ using this VPN.

Bottom Line 

If the idea of committing to an annual plan is slightly scary, Mullvad’s one-off monthly plans are a great way to experience the benefits of using a VPN knowing that you can drop out once the month is over. With decent tech support, a wide range of Linux protocols, and decent download speeds, Mullvad is a great choice for Linux users. 

Read Mullvad VPN Full Review

7.Private Internet Access

Private Internet Access’ user-friendly native Linux client is easy to set up and supports a wide range of distributions, and as there’s a built-in GUI, you don’t need to go through the hassle of opening up your terminal and writing commands to install the VPN – you can find everything you need here. With over 12000 servers providing the fastest speeds and highest levels of encryption, you’ll be able to unblock most websites and streaming apps you encounter, making it possible to watch films and TV shows that aren’t usually available in your country. 

There’s a strong focus on security too, with a strict no-logging policy keeping your personal information safe and P2P support providing that extra barrier you need to stay hidden from copyright holders. And with unlimited bandwidth and unlimited data, you’ll be able to seed and leech files until your heart’s content. 

Works with

Key Features

Available On: Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Manjaro, Kali Linux, CrunchBang
Money-back guarantee 31 days
Number of servers Over 12000
Top download speed reached 71Mbps
VPN locations 95 locations across 74 countries
Maximum devices supported Up to ten simultaneous connections
Plans one month, six month and one-year plans
24/7 live chat Yes

Speed

Not Recommended for... PIA’s move towards Linux-based apps has been a gradual one, and as such, it’s still updating its software to work with the latest versions of Ubuntu.

Bottom Line 

PIA has one of the largest server networks out there, making it the perfect tool for unblocking websites. And with all of the security features you could ever need from your VPN included in all of its plans, it’s a cost-effective way to significantly improve your online privacy.

Read Private Internet Access Full Review

8. CyberGhost VPN

Unlike other providers on the list, there’s no native app for Linux users, but there’s a command-based Linux app that can be easily installed via OpenVPN, with setup instructions for various Linux distributions provided on its website. OpenVPN can be configured using your terminal or the Network Manager, or, if you’re using Chrome or Firefox on your laptop, you can download the browser extensions. 

CyberGhost supports every protocol that’s out there, including WireGuard, so there’s plenty of configuration options if you’re looking to create the most secure connections. In terms of server coverage, CyberGhost has one of the biggest networks, meaning it’ll sneak through any websites or streaming apps you put in front of it. Its security features such as military-grade encryption and double VPN protection are strong enough to spook any hackers that dare to tamper with your connection.

Works with

Key Features

Available On Ubuntu, Debian, Linux Mint, Ubuntu, Chakra
Data logging: Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee 45 days
Number of servers Over 6300
Top download speed reached 84 Mbps
VPN locations 110 locations in 89 countries
Maximum devices supported Up to seven
Plans one month, one year, two year and three-year plans
24/7 live chat Yes

Speed

Connection Ping Download Speed Upload Speed
Quick connect UK server 45 ms 79 Mbps 67 Mbps
Quick connect US server 34 ms 67 Mbps 55.99 Mbps

Not Recommended for... Anyone that lives in China or the UAE. You won’t be able to use this VPN from those locations.

Bottom Line 

With ultra-fast speeds, servers that have been optimized for streaming and torrenting, and a 45-day money-back guarantee, CyberGhost is a popular choice amongst VPN users, and it’s easy to see why. If you fancy an alternative to ExpressVPN or NordVPN but want to be sure your provider is still strong enough to keep you safe online, we’d strongly recommend CyberGhost for Linux users. 

 

Read CyberGhost Full Review

9. Surfshark

There aren’t many providers that offer native apps for Linux, but Surfshark is one of them, and when you consider its subscription plans start from just $1.99 per month, this makes the shark the best value VPN out there for Linux users. The dedicated app is compatible with Ubuntu and Debian operating systems but you can also install it on other distributions by following the installation guide on its website using the OpenVPN software. 

As this provider is based in the British Virgin Islands, it doesn’t fall under the five-eyes, nine-eyes, or 14-eyes jurisdictions, so you can trust its no-logging policy – not least for the fact it’s also independently audited by a third party company. For complete anonymity, you can even pay for your subscription using cryptocurrency. Security features such as a killswitch, DNS leak protection, and privacy-enhanced P2P servers will keep you safe while you’re surfing the net with the shark beneath your feet, and best of all, one subscription protects an unlimited number of devices.

Works with

Key Features

Available On: Ubuntu and Debian,
Data logging Independently audited with a strict no-logging policy.
Money-back guarantee 30 days
Number of servers Over 1700
Top download speed reached 95 Mbps
VPN locations 63 countries
Maximum devices supported Unlimited
Plans one month, one year and two year plans available
24/7 live chat Yes

Speed

Connection Ping Download Speed Upload Speed
Quick connect UK server 34 ms 78 Mbps 23 Mbps
Quick connect US server 23 ms 56 Mbps 34 Mbps

Not Recommended for... Surfshark is a popular choice and its network can get easily congested at peak times, which means you’ll have to surf around for the fastest speeds.

Bottom Line 

If you’re looking for a cheap Linux VPN, you won’t find one offering the same quality features as Surfshark. It is, without a doubt, the cheapest VPN out there for Linux users, and manages to squeeze enough privacy and security features into its plans without ever compromising on quality. 

Read Surfshark Full Review

10. VPNArea

This Bulgaria-based provider has servers in over 70 countries, and while it isn’t transparent about the number of servers it operates, they’re privately owned and under-the-radar enough to unblock the likes of Netflix and BBC iPlayer. With OpenVPN protection and a strict no-logging policy, you shouldn’t have any privacy concerns while you’re using it, either. Additional security features, such as a killswitch, DNS leak protection, and obfuscation promise to keep you safe online. 

VPNArea is one of the few providers to offer a native app for Linux devices, meaning it’s incredibly easy to get going. If you don’t use Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, or Linux Mint, you can still run VPNArea by manually installing the software into your terminal by following the instructions on the provider’s website. Our researchers didn’t experience any disconnections while they were using the VPN and were able to reach gigabit speeds easily in all of the locations they tried.

Works with

Key Features

Available On: Ubuntu, Debian, Fedora, CentOS, Linux Mint
Data logging Strict no-logging policy
Money-back guarantee seven days
Number of servers Over 100
Top download speed reached 73 Mbps
VPN locations Over 70 countries
Maximum devices supported Up to six
Plans one month ($9.90), one-year ($4.92 per month) and three-year ($2.99 per month) plans
24/7 live chat Yes

Speed

Not Recommended for... VPNArea is a lot slower than other VPN providers we’ve tested with Linux.

Bottom Line 

With subscription plans available from $2.99 per month, VPNArea is nearly as cheap as Surfshark, and with a bespoke app for Linux users complete with a user-friendly interface, it’s easy to set up and runs smoothly in the background of whatever devices you’re using. Multi-hop connections allow you to jump between multiple servers but as its speeds aren’t the best, VPNArea is best suited for users that prefer their focus to be on privacy and security. 

Read VPNArea Full Review

Additional Insights and FAQs

Are VPNs Legal to Use with Linux?

VPNs are legal to use in most countries, but some countries with stricter internet censorship have tougher rules on VPNs. If you’re planning on using a VPN somewhere like China, the UAE, Russia or North Korea, make sure you’ve checked the rules!

Will These VPNs Run on Other Devices?

All the VPNs featured in this list also offer native apps for Windows, Mac, iOS, and Android devices, but you’ll need to make sure the platforms you’re using are supported too.

Popular VPNs That Don’t Work with Linux

While it’s possible to run VPNs on most Linux devices using OpenVPN, there are still plenty of VPNs that don’t offer their own native apps. ItsHidden, SecurityKISS, and USAIP are three relatively popular providers that don’t support Linux.

Why Don’t All VPNs Work with Linux?

As Linux is a family of open-source operating systems comprising a variety of different contributions, it’s difficult for many software developers to create apps that support it, due to all of the variations.

Can People Detect my VPN While I’m Using Linux?

When you’re using a VPN, your IP address is completely masked, but it may be possible for your ISP or network administrator to tell you’re using a VPN if you lose connection to it while you’re still connected to the internet. This is why a killswitch is so important.

Can You Trust Your VPN Service?

One of the main reasons people use a VPN is to keep their online activity hidden and their online identity anonymous, so it’s important to trust your provider. An easy way to do this is by checking your provider’s no-logging policy. If it operates under this promise (that’s been independently audited, where possible) you can be sure they’re not keeping any logs of information that could be used to identify you (such as browsing history and timestamps).
You should also check your provider’s general privacy policy. The more detail it goes into about how it protects its users’ privacy, the better. Any vague or ambiguous privacy policies should be taken with a pinch of salt. It’s important to do your own research on any providers that you’re thinking about subscribing to, so be sure to check user-generated websites such as TrustPilot for in-depth reviews on companies, especially before you get locked down into an annual subscription.

Can You Use Free VPNs for Linux?

There are plenty of VPNs out there offering their services for free, but these should always be avoided. Free VPNs don’t offer the same powerful features as paid-for VPNs, and often need to make their money through other methods, such as selling their users’ personal information. This means you could have your identity easily taken by hackers or have your inbox and home address bombarded by annoying junk mail.

VPN Not Working With Your Linux Device? Try These Methods…

If you’re struggling to get your VPN running on your devices that operate Linux, the main issue is usually down to the commands you’ve entered in your terminal. It’s easy to accidentally copy and paste the wrong information, so repeat any installation process from the start, making sure to carefully check every single input you make.
If that doesn’t work, make sure both your devices and your VPN are upgraded to the latest software versions. If that fails, you’ll have to manually troubleshoot your issues with your provider. Thankfully, if you’ve chosen a VPN with quality customer service support, getting an answer to your problem shouldn’t be difficult.

Summary

It used to be the case that finding a VPN with Linux support was difficult, but there’s been a growing number of providers making the move to support native Linux apps in the last few years. Just be aware that software will run differently depending on both the device and Linux distribution that you’re using, so you may want to make the most of the money-back guarantees offered by most providers before you get locked down into an annual subscription.